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Large Accessory Navicular Bone


Overview
The accessory navicular (os navicularum or os tibiale externum) is an extra bone or piece of cartilage located on the inner side of the foot just above the arch. It is incorporated within the posterior tibial tendon, which attaches in this area. An accessory navicular is congenital (present at birth). It What is the tendon at the back of your ankle? not part of normal bone structure and therefore is not present in most people. People who have an accessory navicular often are unaware of the condition if it causes no problems. However, some people with this extra bone develop a painful condition known as accessory navicular syndrome when the bone and/or posterior tibial tendon are aggravated. This can result from any of the following. Trauma, as in a foot or ankle sprain. Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear rubbing against the extra bone. Excessive activity or overuse. Many people with accessory navicular syndrome also have flat feet (fallen arches). Having a flat foot puts more strain on the posterior tibial tendon, which can produce inflammation or irritation of the accessory navicular.

Accessory Navicular

Causes
Like all painful conditions, ANS has a root cause. The cause could be the accessory navicular bone itself producing irritation from shoes or too much activity. Often, however, it is related to injury of one of the structures that attach to the navicular bone. Structures that attach to the navicular bone include abductor hallucis muscle, plantar calcaneonavicular ligament (spring ligament) parts of the deltoid ligament, posterior tibial tendon.

Symptoms
Symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome often appear in adolescence, when bones are maturing. Symptoms include A visible bony prominence on the midfoot, Redness and swelling, Vague pain or throbbing in the arch, especially after physical activity.

Diagnosis
Accessory navicular syndrome is diagnosed by asking about symptoms and examining the foot for skin irritation and swelling. Doctors may assess the area for discomfort by pressing on the bony prominence. Foot structure, muscle strength, joint motion and walking patterns may also be evaluated.

Non Surgical Treatment
Ideally, getting rid of the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome will involve soothing the inflammation and irritation in your foot. So, for starters, your podiatrist may have you rest the area, allowing the inflamed tendon and bone to heal. This may be accomplished by wearing a cast or boot designed to keep you from moving the problem area. Your podiatrist may also suggest using ice to reduce the swelling and inflammation, and anti-inflammatory medications (like ibuprofen, or sometimes a cortisone shot or other steroid medication).

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment
If non-surgical treatment fails to relieve the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome, surgery may be appropriate. Surgery may involve removing the accessory bone, reshaping the area, and repairing the posterior tibial tendon to improve its function. This extra bone is not needed for normal foot function.

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برچسب: How does Achilles tendonitis occur?، Where are the femur tibia and fibula?، How much does it cost to lengthen your legs?،
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Extra Bone In Foot Accessory Navicular


Overview
The accessory navicular (os navicularum or os tibiale externum) is an extra bone or piece of cartilage located on the inner side of the foot just above the arch. It is incorporated within the posterior tibial tendon, which attaches in this area. An accessory navicular is congenital (present at birth). It is not part of normal bone structure and therefore is not present in most people. People who have an accessory navicular often are unaware of the condition if it causes no problems. However, some people with this extra bone develop a painful condition known as accessory navicular syndrome when the bone and/or posterior tibial tendon are aggravated. This can result from any of the following. Trauma, as in a foot or ankle sprain. Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear rubbing against the extra bone. Excessive activity or overuse. Many people with accessory navicular syndrome also have flat feet (fallen arches). Having a flat foot puts more strain on the posterior tibial tendon, which Can you get taller with yoga? produce inflammation or irritation of the accessory navicular.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes
It is commonly believed that the posterior tibial tendon loses its vector of pull to heighten the arch. As the posterior muscle contracts, the tendon is no longer pulling straight up on the navicular but must course around the prominence of bone and first pull medially before pulling upward. In addition, the enlarged bones may irritate and damage the insertional area of the posterior tibial tendon, making it less functional. Therefore, the presence of the accessory navicular bone does contribute to posterior tibial dysfunction.

Symptoms
Many people have accessory (?extra?) naviculars (figure 1) - a prominent extra bone extending from the navicular bone. Most accessory naviculars are completely asymptomatic. However, some individuals will develop pain on the inside of their midfoot. Pain may occur from the pressure of the shoe ware against the prominence, irritating either the bone itself or the fibrous junction where the accessory bone meets the regular navicular. Alternatively, the fibrous junction or interface may become painful as a result of tension applied by the posterior tibial tendon through its connection or insertion at that site. Often, individuals will be asymptomatic for years, however, a new pair of shoes or a change in their activity level can cause symptoms. The accessory navicular itself typically develops during adolescence, when the two areas of the navicular bone fail to fuse together.

Diagnosis
Accessory navicular syndrome is diagnosed by asking about symptoms and examining the foot for skin irritation and swelling. Doctors may assess the area for discomfort by pressing on the bony prominence. Foot structure, muscle strength, joint motion and walking patterns may also be evaluated.

Non Surgical Treatment
Traditional medicine often falls short when it comes to treatment for this painful condition. As similar to other chronic pain conditions, the following regimen is usually recommended: RICE, immobilization, anti-inflammatory medications, cortisone injections, and/or innovative surgical options. Clients familiar with Prolotherapy often say? no thanks? to those choices, as they know these treatments will only continue to weaken the area in the foot. Instead, they choose Prolotherapy to strengthen the structures in the medial foot.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment
Surgical treatment of the accessory navicular syndrome with simple excision has the advantages of less invasive to the posterior tibial tenden and the medial longitudinal arch of the foot, shorter time of immobilization of the foot and stay in hospital, small incision and good clinical results. This procedure is one of the best selective treatments for the accessory navicular syndrome, especially for the patients without flatfoot deformity and old sprain injury.

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برچسب: Do you get taller when you stretch?، What causes pain in the Achilles tendon?، Why do they call it the Achilles heel?،
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